Perfecting Patisserie – book review

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perfecting
Good morning! I am back after my sudden and long absence – and finally with the internet in my house! No more soap-tasting coffee in the chains for the sake of wi-fi connection! During this weeks I have been cooking a lot (who would even doubt) so I gathered a few new recipes, two of which I can’t wait to share with you. I also made up my mind to add two weekly columns, one will be dedicated to the Russian cuisine (after all I am Russian, even if a lot of people consider me Italian) and the second will be dedicated to the weekend breakfast – the very adorable thing for me.
Right now I have just a couple of minutes, so I will try a new genre: book review. Several days ago due to my work (no, I am not an editor of healthy food magazine; just this book was a perfect sample of paper we wanted to print on) I got the book by Tim Kinnaird Perfecting Patisserie: mastering macarons, madeleines, meringues and more.  To be honest, I am indifferent  to macarons (and to be completely honest – I am scared of them). But there was an section about tarts, which I simply couldn’t skip. So I decided to go through the book.
The book starts with theoretical introduction (I learned a lot about eggs), followed by sections dedicated to a certain type of dough/dessert with the detailed instruction how to make the dough, recipes with this dough and finally the most common mistakes (I like this section as there were pictures, so you could find the one portraying something close to your screwed cake and figure out what went wrong). Book finishes with some decorating ideas, glazes, creams, custard etc.
I tried one recipe from this book, a lemon tart (a new, more “professional” version of my so beloved French tart) and the result was as from the best French bakery, above all my expectations.
I have a positive overall impression, as the book in details describe the method and highlight the possible mistakes. Recipes are mostly hard or of middle difficulty, but there are a couple of easier, like biscuits. The book is not expensive, it costs 10 pounds, which I think is a good deal for the content. Recommended for those who would like to get a more professional grip of the French desserts and are willing to spend time doing it.

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